Get It Done: Surprising Lessons from the Science of Motivation (A FAN Program with Ayelet Fishbach, Ph.D)

We are so happy to support Family Action Network (FAN) as they welcome Ayelet Fishbach, Ph.D., author of the new book, Get It Done: Surprising Lessons from the Science of Motivation. Prof. Fishbach will be interviewed by Wendy Wood, Ph.D. This virtual event is free and open to the public. Registration is required. Click HERE to reserve your spot!

This event will be recorded and available later on the FAN website and YouTube channel.

AFTER-HOURS EVENT: Attendees who purchase a copy of Get It Done from The Book Stall are invited to attend an AFTER-HOURS event hosted by Fishbach that will start immediately after the webinar. The link to register for the AFTER-HOURS program will appear in red font at the top of an email from The Book Stall. Look for it right after your receipt arrives!

About the Book: In her insightful new book Get It Done: Surprising Lessons from the Science of Motivation, Ayelet Fishbach, Ph.D., the Jeffrey Breakenridge Keller Professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, takes on the questions that plague us most: What happens when the person you most want to influence is yourself? How do you know where to start? How do you carry on in the face of roadblocks and distractions? How do you decide which tasks and ambitions to prioritize?

Presenting a new theoretical framework for self-motivated action, Fishbach explains how to identify the right goals, attack the “middle problem,” battle temptations, utilize the help of others around you, and so much more. With fascinating research from the field of motivation science and compelling stories of people who unlocked the secrets of self-motivation, she reveals many new insights such as 1) why having uncertain incentives increases motivation while too many incentives decreases motivation; 2) how the “illusion” of progress towards a goal increases motivation; 3) how to know if and when a glass half full or half empty perspective will motivate you; 4) how to keep yourself motivated during the middle of your journey by shortening the distance or identifying arbitrary temporal landmarks.

About the Author: Ayelet Fishbach, Ph.D. is the Jeffrey Breakenridge Keller Professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. She studies social psychology, management, and consumer behavior, and is an expert on motivation and decision making. Fishbach’s research has been published in psychology, management, and marketing journals, including Psychological Review, Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Journal of Marketing Research, Psychological Science, and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Her research is regularly featured in the media, including The Wall Street Journal, CNN, The Chicago Tribune, NPR and was selected to be featured in the New York Times’ annual "Year in Ideas."

About the Interviewer: Wendy Wood, Ph.D. is Provost Professor of Psychology and Business at the University of Southern California. Wood is a social psychologist, and her research addresses the ways that habits guide behavior—and why they are so difficult to break, as well as evolutionary models of gender differences in behavior. Her research has been featured in The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Washington Post, and NPR. She is the author of the 2019 book Good Habits, Bad Habits: The Science of Making Positive Changes that Stick.

 

Event date: 

Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Event address: 

Online Zoom webinar!
Get It Done: Surprising Lessons from the Science of Motivation Cover Image
$29.00
ISBN: 9780316538343
Availability: On Our Shelves Now--Subject to Availability
Published: Little, Brown Spark - January 4th, 2022

Discover a "compelling" framework for setting and achieving your goals (Carol Dweck, author of Mindset), from a psychologist on the cutting edge of motivational science.

A great deal of ink has been spilled on the subject of motivating and influencing others, but what happens when the person you most want to influence is you?